World War I in Africa

What happened in Africa should not stay in Africa.
Reblogged from adayacross
Using samples recycled from other stories, A Day, Across tells of a young woman looking for what connects her to her great-grandfather. A former member of the South African Native Labour Corps in WW1, all that remains of him are censored letters from France. By combining media from now and then, history is remixed and re-performed to link her present moment to a century ago. Her epic journey to find her past will take her across continents, images, and time. How did one shot in the Balkans echo so loudly that it is still heard in South Africa today?Director: Sanjin MufticVocal Coach: Rebecca Makin-TaylorChoreographer: Iman IsaacsCast and Crew: CityVarsity 3rd year Students

Using samples recycled from other stories, A Day, Across tells of a young woman looking for what connects her to her great-grandfather. A former member of the South African Native Labour Corps in WW1, all that remains of him are censored letters from France. By combining media from now and then, history is remixed and re-performed to link her present moment to a century ago. Her epic journey to find her past will take her across continents, images, and time. How did one shot in the Balkans echo so loudly that it is still heard in South Africa today?
Director: Sanjin Muftic
Vocal Coach: Rebecca Makin-Taylor
Choreographer: Iman Isaacs
Cast and Crew: CityVarsity 3rd year Students

Reblogged from greatwar-1914
greatwar-1914:

September 26th, 1914 - Battle of Sandfontein
Pictured - South African cavalry cross a river in Southwest Africa.  It has often been said that horses were the real heroes of the African campaign.
The South African force that invaded German Southwest Africa was divided into separate columns, one of which was Force A, around 3,000 men and four guns commanded by Sir Henry Lukin. This battle group marched towards the town of Sandfontein in late September, hoping to revitalize the men after a tiring journey with the wells of the town.  However, they failed to pay heed to the movements of the German forces known to be in the area.
The South African forces straggled onwards, exhausted and dehydrated, without worrying about the German dispositions.  Suddenly, a German trap was sprung, and four German machine guns opened fire on the surprised South Africans.  The machine guns gave cover to the 1,700 German riflemen, almost entirely askaris (black African soldiers). 
The German pounce was led by Joachin von Heydebreck, who performed his task well.  His ten artillery places had excellent positions and they rained down fire from a mountain onto the South Africans.  The men of Force A, using a small building as a hospital-cum-headquarters, tried to return fire with their four cannons.  Shortly, their guns were knocked out and their telegraph lines to the rear cut. 
Realizing that they had run out of options, the South Africans waved a white flag.  The German fire ceased and Heydebreck went to take his prisoners, who outnumbered his own force by about two-to-one. Heydebreck congratulated the South African officers on their gallant defence, and set about burying the dead of both sides.

greatwar-1914:

September 26th, 1914 - Battle of Sandfontein

Pictured - South African cavalry cross a river in Southwest Africa.  It has often been said that horses were the real heroes of the African campaign.

The South African force that invaded German Southwest Africa was divided into separate columns, one of which was Force A, around 3,000 men and four guns commanded by Sir Henry Lukin. This battle group marched towards the town of Sandfontein in late September, hoping to revitalize the men after a tiring journey with the wells of the town.  However, they failed to pay heed to the movements of the German forces known to be in the area.

The South African forces straggled onwards, exhausted and dehydrated, without worrying about the German dispositions.  Suddenly, a German trap was sprung, and four German machine guns opened fire on the surprised South Africans.  The machine guns gave cover to the 1,700 German riflemen, almost entirely askaris (black African soldiers). 

The German pounce was led by Joachin von Heydebreck, who performed his task well.  His ten artillery places had excellent positions and they rained down fire from a mountain onto the South Africans.  The men of Force A, using a small building as a hospital-cum-headquarters, tried to return fire with their four cannons.  Shortly, their guns were knocked out and their telegraph lines to the rear cut. 

Realizing that they had run out of options, the South Africans waved a white flag.  The German fire ceased and Heydebreck went to take his prisoners, who outnumbered his own force by about two-to-one. Heydebreck congratulated the South African officers on their gallant defence, and set about burying the dead of both sides.

Reblogged from greatwar-1914
greatwar-1914:

September 15th, 1914 - Beginning of the Maritz Rebellion
Pictured - Manie Maritz
After the conclusion of the Second Anglo-Boer War in South Africa, many of the defeated Boer rebels had refused to sign pledges promising not to rebel again.  Known as the “bitter-enders”, these former guerrillas were exiled from South Africa.  The bitter-enders and their supporters saw the Great War as their opportunity to rise up again.
South Africa bordered German South West Africa (modern Namibia) and when the war began the South Africans mobilized an army to invade.  This included just over 10,000 Boers under General Manie Maritz.
On the 15th of September, a couple of prominent Boers set off to Potchefstroom to meet with other Boer leaders.  On the way, a group of policemen working to catch a local gang of criminals fired on the car, killing one man.  This inflamed public opinion.
General Maritz now declared himself in alliance with the Germans, beginning his rebellion.  However, he only had 12,000 troops, and facing the 32,000 mustered by the South African government, the Boer rebellion petered out by January 1915.

greatwar-1914:

September 15th, 1914 - Beginning of the Maritz Rebellion

Pictured - Manie Maritz

After the conclusion of the Second Anglo-Boer War in South Africa, many of the defeated Boer rebels had refused to sign pledges promising not to rebel again.  Known as the “bitter-enders”, these former guerrillas were exiled from South Africa.  The bitter-enders and their supporters saw the Great War as their opportunity to rise up again.

South Africa bordered German South West Africa (modern Namibia) and when the war began the South Africans mobilized an army to invade.  This included just over 10,000 Boers under General Manie Maritz.

On the 15th of September, a couple of prominent Boers set off to Potchefstroom to meet with other Boer leaders.  On the way, a group of policemen working to catch a local gang of criminals fired on the car, killing one man.  This inflamed public opinion.

General Maritz now declared himself in alliance with the Germans, beginning his rebellion.  However, he only had 12,000 troops, and facing the 32,000 mustered by the South African government, the Boer rebellion petered out by January 1915.

Posted on 04, September 2014 September 04 2014 2014年9月4日 by wwiafrica

On today’s podcast, I speak with Kathleen Bomani and Jacques Enaudeau, co-founders of the World War I in Africa project.

Through the World War I in Africa project, Ms. Bomani and Mr. Enaudeau seek not to commemorate the passing of the war, but to restore its meaning by challenging boilerplate narratives and highlighting new narrators.

As the project’s website explains, two million African soldiers, workers and porters participated in the war, yet their story remains largely ignored to this day. “Europe’s 20th century started in 1914, and the yoke of colonialism steered Africa along for the ride,” Bomani and Enaudeau write. “Battles between the French, British, Belgian, German and Portuguese colonial empires pitted Africans against each other on their own soil,” they continue.

Tens of thousands of African lives were lost, while migration trends were set, economies transformed, and borders redefined all as a result of “the war to end all wars.”

You can find more information about the World War I in Africa Project through the links below.

website: http://wwiafrica.ghost.io/
twitter: https://twitter.com/wwiafrica
facebook: https://www.facebook.com/wwiafrica
tumblr: http://wwiafrica.tumblr.com/

To access more of my reporting, please visit ptinti.com (http://ptinti.com/) and Beacon reader (https://www.beaconreader.com/peter-tinti).